Skittles

I just dropped a new mix dedicated to the one and only SkittlesBeats on SoundCloud and Mixcloud. Please be sure to check the mix out on Mixcloud and follow to be the first to hear my new mix series Heavy Rotation, launching this Saturday!

Art by Alix Lytton: http://twitter.com/alixesque
Become a patron for early access to my content: http://patreon.com/pawprintandrew
Follow me around the Interwebs: http://about.me/andrewokwuosah
— TRACKLIST —
00:00: Dj CUTMAN – Let’s Jam Some Wind!
2:10: Dj CUTMAN – Chao Garden (ft. Breakbeat Heartbeat)
4:55: Grimecraft – POKEHAT
8:38: CG5- Inkoming (Splatoon 2)
12:04: Nokae- Stairfax
14:30: Owl City- Fireflies (Dj CUTMAN Remix)
17:29: SkittlesBeats- LILLIPUP!
19:19 Mykah- Long Live Splatfest!
22:35 Party Members- Everytime We Splat
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I’m on Patreon!

I’ve been creating content online for almost six years now, and have reached a point where the biggest thing holding me back from creating better content is revenue.

And so, I want to ask you to help me make my dream of creating content on a daily basis a reality. I’m not looking to build out a massive studio or invest in fancy cars, instead I want to produce content at a higher quality while supporting myself financially in college and beyond along with giving back to other creators.

Please consider becoming a patron, and help me live my dream. Thank you!

Why teachers shouldn’t be responsible for low test scores

Tests showcase what a student has learned on a certain topic, so it should only make sense that teachers are responsible for low test scores, right? Wrong, teachers can only do so much to help out a student so the blame for low test scores shouldn’t be placed on them.

There are a lot of factors that go into whether a student does well on a test, and while teaching is definitely a factor, it’s not the only one. Students that choose not to study the material will obviously do worse than someone who did. Teachers can’t be there to watch over a student and make sure he/she studies. That responsibility falls solely on the student. Students are also just ordinary human beings that have their good days and their bad days, and even if the teacher did their job well, that test score’s going to drop if it happens to be taken on an off day. Teachers shouldn’t be held accountable for low test scores caused by factors they can’t control.

Holding teachers responsible for low test scores will force teachers to teach to the test. Students wouldn’t be able to get the full value from a course because their teachers are too focused on teaching to a test crafted by the school district. Teachers would be pressed for time trying to cram in all the material before test day, and won’t be able to teach to the best of their abilities. Instead, they’ll be worried about whether their classes’ average score is enough to keep them in a job.

I’m not saying that teachers shouldn’t be held accountable. They should, but it should have context behind it. If a student gets a low test score, compare it to their overall performance in the class. Look at performance reviews to see if the teacher teaches well or better yet, just sit in on a class. Any of these methods paint a more complete picture of a teacher.

Teachers shouldn’t be responsible for low test scores because it will ultimately have a negative impact on the students. Let teachers do their jobs without being focused on appealing to a scantron.

Rave (Mix 3.0)

A new mix appears! Here are some tracks that’ll make you want to rave:

— DOWNLOAD LINKS —

Personal Update: March 2017

Long time no see, blog! I promise that I haven’t forgotten about this domain. In fact, this is a big part of today’s announcement: daily content will flow from me to the Interwebs. Here’s the schedule of what to expect:

  • Monday & Friday: New posts right here on this humble abode (told you, I haven’t forgotten about it)
  • Tuesday, Thursday, & Saturday: New videos on YouTube
  • Wednesday: New post on Workaholic
  • Sunday: This Week on GameChops, recapping the top geeky tunes of the week on GameSentral

This change is being made to help me do more for you. 2017 is the year of transparency, and part of that is sharing more content with you, so expect to hear more from this keyboard every single day.

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you on YouTube tomorrow.

Into the Wild

Into the Wild is a must-read for all those that want to live a more nomadic lifestyle. It follows Chris McCandless as he hitchhikes his way around the nation, working odd jobs and staying in even odder circumstances, as he makes his way to his ultimate goal of Alaska. “I’m riding the rails now. What fun, I wish I had jumped trains earlier,” Chris McCandless said in a Mar. 5, 1992 letter to Jan Burress (p. 53). Krakauer does an exquisite job at capturing the sense of adventure McCandless felt while exploring his subject as a person. He also illuminates the topic of survival by using McCandless’ journal to provide a first-hand look at what it was like to be a nomad in Seattle. I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Source

  • Krakauer, Jon. Into the Wild. Anchor Books, 1997.